Shows & Events

CAP OFF SEMA WEEK WITH DISCOUNT TIX TO GUITARIST KENNY WAYNE SHEPHERD'S SHOW

Popular blues guitarist Kenny Wayne Shepherd will perform at The Joint in the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas on Friday, November 2, and all registered SEMA Show attendees can catch the concert for the reduced price of $25. The Mopar-lovin' six-stringer will himself attend the SEMA Show on November 1 and 2, and personally requested that Showgoers receive a discounted ticket price. Shepherd's latest project car, a '70 Duster, will be displayed in the Mopar Performance Booth.

Tickets can be purchased through the Ticketmaster website (www.ticketmaster.com) or by calling 866/448-7849. SEMA Show attendees will later receive the special event promo code for the discounted price.

With five albums, two Grammy nominations, two Billboard Music Awards, two Orville H. Gibson Awards, four straight #1 blues albums, a string of #1 rock singles and one film under his belt, Kenny Wayne Shepherd is a growing blues legend. Cracking into the music industry at age 16, his 1995 debut Ledbetter Heights has sold over a million copies, while follow-up Trouble Is... and third album Live On both earned Grammy nominations.

Shepherd's most recent project, a DVD/CD entitled TEN DAYS OUT; Blues from the Backroads, captures a 10-day portable recording and performing blitz with the most renowned artists to ever play the blues. Backed by Double Trouble (esteemed bandmates of the late Stevie Ray Vaughn) and produced by Jerry Harrison, Shepherd sat down with B.B. King, the late Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown, Hubert Sumlin, PInetop Perkins, and Honeyboy Edwards, to name just a few. Partial proceeds from the project are being donated to Music Maker Relief Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to helping impoverished blues artists.

“I cut my teeth as a blues artist,” Shepherd says. "My first three records mixed my styles, and the last one, The Place You’re In, was a pretty heavy dose of rock and roll. So this became a perfect time to present a solid dose of the blues."

The album has no overdubs and no high-tech fixing.

“What happened is what you hear," Shepherd says. "We kept it as real as possible."