SEMA News

Cover Story

Among the most popular destinations at the SEMA Show, Hot Rod Alley is home to exhibitors who design and manufacture products intended to add reliability, performance and comfort to American classics. The hot-rod niche has seen significant growth in recent years, and it’s currently estimated to be a $1.26-billion industry, according to the Hot Rod Industry Alliance’s “2017 Biannual Report.” Gauging by the number of Hot Rod Alley exhibitors honored in the 2017 Global Media Awards, it’s also a category that’s gaining momentum worldwide.

 

Business

  • John WaraniakWhile identifying multiple growth opportunities for the specialty-equipment industry, the recently released “SEMA Advanced Vehicle Technology Opportunities Report” (see p. 114) also forecasts a significant evolution of supply, sales and marketing channels for advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) over the next decade. To better understand the changing dynamics of the ADAS aftermarket, SEMA News turned to SEMA Vice President of Vehicle Technology John Waraniak.

  • ADAS and CVT SystemsSEMA research indicates that the U.S. aftermarket for advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and connected vehicle technologies (CVT), although still in its infancy, can be expected to grow into a $1.5 billion industry within the next five years. With so much at stake in these rapidly emerging technologies, SEMA has made identifying ADAS/CVT opportunities for association members a key priority.

  • Among the most popular destinations at the SEMA Show, Hot Rod Alley is home to exhibitors who design and manufacture products intended to add reliability, performance and comfort to American classics. The hot-rod niche has seen significant growth in recent years, and it’s currently estimated to be a $1.26-billion industry, according to the Hot Rod Industry Alliance’s “2017 Biannual Report.” Gauging by the number of Hot Rod Alley exhibitors honored in the 2017 Global Media Awards, it’s also a category that’s gaining momentum worldwide.

  • ApexWhile pursuing his biochemistry degree, car enthusiast Tyler Copenhaver worked his way through Arizona State University by part-time bartending and scavenging, restoring and reselling classic cars. When his Scottsdale neighbors complained about the “heaps” in his driveway, he found commercial space in Phoenix. He soon noted a gap in the customizing market: a one-stop shop that would eliminate the need to tow a project car from tire shop to body shop to engine builder to whatever else was required.

Business Technology

  • How many of us have purchased something because a friend told us how great it was? Perhaps it was a pair of shoes or a pocket knife. Maybe it was a MIG welder or a motorcycle (guilty). If a friend says, “This thing is awesome and you should get one,” we are likely to consider purchasing whatever that “thing” is. Interestingly, it isn’t just the opinions of our friends that matter.

Chris Kersting

  • Chris Kersting

    Over the years, SEMA has played a role helping our members see upcoming opportunities—and challenges—by looking at prior-year industry sales data. To that end, the association provides a research department that publishes studies documenting both industry growth and recession and establishing data about the size of the various markets that make up our large and extremely varied specialty products industry.

Education

  • EducationAmong SEMA’s chief goals as a trade association is working to ensure the industry’s future, in part by expanding youth engagement programs. The goal is to interest young talent in car culture, and ultimately to fill a variety of emerging technological, skilled, creative and administrative positions. A number of those efforts also involve collaborating on initiatives conceived and operated by outside organizations, with SEMA serving as a catalyst.

From The Hill

  • Sean CrawfordMost political coverage centers on Washington D.C.; however, less visible decisions made in state capitols profoundly impact lives and businesses. Statehouses are especially critical for SEMA members, as many—perhaps most—specialty auto products are directly regulated at the state level.

Government Affairs

  • Law & OrderColorado—Emissions Inspection: A bill has been introduced to extend the emissions inspection cycle from two years to four years for ’82-and-newer model-year vehicles. It has been referred to the Senate Transportation Committee.

Industry News

  • ’19 Chevy Camaro: The Camaro will get an extensive mid-cycle facelift for ’19.

    ’19 GMC Sierra 1500 All-Terrain: GMC will get its own version of the Silverado Trail Boss and, according to a source in the know, it may arrive under the All-Terrain nameplate.

    Range Rover Evoque: Codenamed L551, the new Evoque will be built on an overhauled version of the current D8 architecture. Refinements to the underpinnings will focus on improving ride comfort.

  • Industry news from SEMA-member companies, including Global Shop Solutions, Falken Tires, Edelbrock, Hubb Filters and Vortech Superchargers.

  • Manufacturers of air intakes, superchargers, exhaust systems and other parts for diesel and late-model gasoline vehicles can now test for emissions compliance at the SEMA Garage following a recent renovation that included the addition of particulate matter measuring equipment. The remodel doubled the size of the installation center and increased the floor space of the emissions lab, allowing for more SEMA members to utilize the resources simultaneously.

International

Internet

  • InternetWhile the wunderkinds in artificial intelligence (AI) labs have been tantalizing us for years with talk of AI products for business, the first money-in-the-bank applications are starting to emerge—especially when it comes to email marketing. Essentially, email marketing appears destined to be infused with AI tools forevermore. And if the promises hold up, the marketer’s job of successfully targeting and closing on prime prospects is going to get a lot easier.

New Products

  • ’17–’18 Ford Raptor V6-3.5L Scorcher Blue Power ModuleFrom blind-spot monitoring and backup cameras to lane-departure warning, collision warning and everything in between, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) represent a billion-dollar opportunity in the mobile electronics segment of the automotive aftermarket industry. Mobile electronics products were well represented at the 2017 SEMA Show. The following is a collection of products that were on display in the New Products Showcase last year, along with commentaries by industry experts.

  • By all indications, the hot-rod market continues to thrive in today’s economic climate. As the hobby evolves, a younger group of enthusiasts is bringing fresh ideas and expanding the traditional boundaries of what qualifies as a hot rod. For many of today’s hot rodders, the “good old days” were the ’60s and ’70s, and vehicles from those model years are in demand. Trucks and late-model musclecars are also growing in popularity.

People And Places

  • Eight candidates are running for positions on the 2018–2021 SEMA Board of Directors. This year, five seats are open in the manufacturers, distributors/retailers and services categories. Voting will take place online May 8–22 and is open to current SEMA-member companies. Votes must be cast by each company’s primary contact. Election information and a ballot participation code went out to members via postal mail at the end of April.

Products / Catalog

Required Reading

  • DrivingThe SEMA Show is the premier automotive aftermarket tradeshow, bringing together manufacturers of automotive parts and accessories with buyers from all over the world. Among those who gather at the exclusive event in Las Vegas are international journalists who are there to share with their readers the latest trends, new products and announcements from the Show. The publications below give a perspective on how international media portray the SEMA Show in their part of the world.

SEMA Heritage

  • HeritageIn 1954, Wally Parks—who at the time was in charge of both the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) and Hot Rod—dispatched a small crew of men to cross the country. Their goal: Promote the relatively new sport of organized drag racing—the safe, NHRA way—by working with local car clubs to put on races. They towed a small travel trailer full of everything they’d need for the event, from timing equipment and a P.A. system to trophies.