SEMA eNews Vol. 20, No. 44, November 2, 2017

Award-Winning Foose Roadster on Display in Eaton Booth

By SEMA Editors

  Magnatude Roadster
This 1932 Muroc roadster was built for the late Jerry Magnuson, who bought a fendered Muroc Roadster from Kugel Komponents, primarily using it as a test vehicle for his successful Magnacharger supercharger program.
   

A customized 1932 Muroc roadster, "Magnatude," is on display in the Eaton Booth at the 2017 SEMA Show. Magnatude may be best remembered as the car that was named the 2010 Goodguys Street Rod d'Elegance.

The car was built for the late Jerry Magnuson, who bought a fendered Muroc Roadster from Kugel Komponents, primarily using it as a test vehicle for his successful Magnacharger supercharger program. He made a few upgrades, such as hidden headlights in the front fenders and an engine blower with built-in inner-cooler. When it came time to finish the vehicle, Magnuson contacted Foose Design. 

At Foose, the vehicle had its body smoothed and aligned, and the suspension components and rearend were reshaped. Foose designed custom one-off wheels and a two-tone butterscotch and champagne paint scheme. Jim Griffin installed the Foose-designed interior, and all new custom trim was added. Signature styling pieces, including the pedals, interior door panels and gauges, all feature Muroc badging. 


Murocs were steel-bodied rollers with independent suspensions that were made available for sale by Kugel Komponents. Loosely based on the Boydster II, Chip Foose and hot-rod illustrator Thom Taylor worked on the original Muroc body design. The bodies were fabricated by Marcel DeLay of Marcel's Custom Metal in Corona, California. Chip and Kugel designed the frames and Kugel component parts can be found throughout the vehicle. Only 20 total production vehicles were produced, 10 with fenders and 10 without. 

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