Market Research

Specialty Automotive Aftermarket in the U.K.

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The U.K. market, the fourth largest in Western Europe, is also one of the easiest markets in Western Europe for SEMA-member companies to gain a foothold. The lack of language barriers and the relatively regulation-free environment regarding vehicle customization form a basis for exploring the market. These two factors, coupled with a sizable and growing portion of British consumers who seek to personalize their vehicles, make the U.K. market attractive for specialty equipment companies.

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2001 SEMA Market Study

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2001 market studyOn an annual basis we continue to see the specialty automotive products industry growing. Since 1992, the industry has had an average annual growth of 8 percent. That's eight years of nice increases. How long can the industry keep up such a pace? There are many companies within the industry that are still reporting appreciable sales gains. Of course there is the other side of the coin and some companies are struggling, but as a whole the industry appears to be holding its own. One of the secrets to industry growth is niches. Since most of the companies involved with specialty automotive equipment are small, niche markets that are unprofitable for larger firms provide a good living with potential for growth. Combined with owners and operators who are enthusiasts at heart, niche markets provide an excellent spawning ground for innovative products.

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2001 Compact Performance Market Update

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1999 SEMA Market Study

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1999 market study coverThe specialty automotive equipment industry has always been hard to quantify; not only is it fragmented, but depending on who you talk to, the market definition has any number of possibilities. The approach used here defines specialty automotive equipment as products and services used to improve or otherwise change production vehicles. For the consumers who purchase the industry's products, the real distinction is that performance parts and accessories make their vehicles more enjoyable. In 1998, manufacturer sales of specialty automotive products reached $7.47 billion at manufacturer level, and retail sales were $21.2 billion. That's an increase of 71.6 percent from 1990, when manufacturers' sales of specialty equipment were $4.352 billion.

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1999 Trends and Forecasts

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1999 Truck Accessory Report

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1998 SEMA Market Study

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1998 Market Study CoverThe automotive aftermarket is typically divided into three major segments: repair parts, service and maintenance, and specialty equipment. The approach used here defines specialty equipment as aftermarket products and services used to improve or otherwise change production vehicles. In this way we differentiate specialty equipment from repair parts used to maintain a vehicle in its original condition. In 1997, sales of specialty automotive products reached $6.85 billion at manufacturer level and retail sales were $19.33 billion. An increase of 57.4 percent from 1990, when the manufacturers' sales of specialty equipment was $4.35 billion.

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