MRN at PWA

SEMA Member News—September/October 2013  

MRN at PWA

 

Building on the success of the sold-out 2012 Rep Technology Roundtable, the MRN will host a collection of business-critical discussions moderated by industry thought leaders at the 2013 SEMA Show on November 3 from 3:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Building on the success of the sold-out 2012 Rep Technology Roundtable, the MRN will host a collection of business-critical discussions moderated by industry thought leaders at the 2013 SEMA Show on November 3 from 3:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m. 

   

The Manufacturers Representative Network (MRN) will present several events in conjunction with the 2013 Performance Warehouse Association (PWA) Conference, to be held September 22–25 in Phoenix.

MRN General Membership Meeting: Exclusive to manufacturer representatives, the MRN will hold an open meeting for both members and nonmembers (interested in learning more about the network) September 22 from 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. The event is free to attend, but you must be registered to attend the PWA event.

MRN, MPMC, LTAA and YEN Networking Mixer: Join members of the SEMA family for good food, drink and conversation September 24 from 6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m. at the PWA Conference. This mixer is quickly becoming a PWA tradition and is a great evening “starter” after a full day of meetings. It is sponsored by MRC, MPMC, LTAA and YEN, but all industry professionals are welcome to attend!

SEMA Show MRN Roundtables

Exclusively for reps, the MRN will host a series of roundtable discussions at the SEMA Show on November 3, 2013, from 3:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m. Building on the success of the sold-out 2012 Rep Technology Roundtable, the MRN will host a collection of business-critical discussions moderated by industry thought leaders. Through intimate roundtable discussions, attendees will have the opportunity ask questions and receive practical solutions that address real-world issues. Don’t miss this one! Space is limited.


Four Sales Truths to Set You Free

By John Chapin, www.completeselling.com

If you’re going to be successful in sales over the long haul, there are four concepts you need to fully accept and buy into.

  1. It’s Not About Chasing the Sale: Instead of chasing the sale, work on the connection and the relationship. The best salespeople—the ones who have had successful careers over the long haul—have not burnt out and have led happy, fulfilling lives, both personally and professionally, and have always focused on doing what’s right for the other person. In order to have a long, happy, successful sales career, take care of people and relationships; instead of having to chase sales, the sales will chase you.
  2. You Have to Be Completely Accountable: You need to have several levels of accountability in place to ensure that you do what you need to do in order to be successful. The most important is accountability to yourself. Your second level consists of people you work with and other professionals, including managers and bosses, coaches and mentors, mastermind groups and, in some cases, even your peers. The third level includes friends, family and acquaintances. But ultimately the buck stops with you. You’ve got to push yourself and be willing to do whatever it takes to hold your feet to the fire.
  3. You’ve Got to Be Brutally Honest With Yourself: You have to see yourself and your sales career, warts and all. If you don’t have the sales you need, the prospects you need and the overall results you want, it’s probably your fault. You need to get enough leverage on yourself that you push yourself to get the job done every day. Most people will skirt responsibility and point the finger elsewhere when it comes to reasons for their failure. Accept responsibility. Success or failure is completely up to you.
  4. You Have to Get Organized and Get Control of Your Time: Begin with goals and a plan. Decide what your business goals are for the year and then break them down to monthly, weekly and daily activity. Organize, clean up and set up your work area, files, computer, calendar and other tools, and then get to work. This doesn’t have to be complicated, but it does take hard work and self-discipline to stick to your plan and do what must be done every day.

When you’re at work, work. And when you’re working, make sure it’s on the items that will give you the most return on your time, effort and energy. You should be working on the 20% of items that give you 80% of your results. All other items should be delegated or eliminated.

In sales, most of your time should be spent prospecting, closing or otherwise chasing business. Continue to improve your organization and time management until you are spending 80%–90% or more of your time in these three key areas. and then put checks and balances in place to keep yourself at that level.

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