Vehicle Technology

Auto 3.0: Fast, Cool, Smart and Connected

SEMA’s Vice President of Vehicle Technology on the State of Advanced Vehicle Technology

Today’s cars, trucks and the auto industry and performance aftermarket as a whole are being reinvented, restructured and re-envisioned. Cars are quickly moving from standalone mechanical products to smart electronic products and connected smart products in what might be called Auto 3.0, the Third Automotive Revolution. Not since the beginning of the industry have we seen such disruption in how cars are designed, developed, customized, sold, serviced and owned. Vehicles drive themselves, avoid accidents and connect to their owners’ digital lifestyles. They produce lower emissions, go faster and are safer, smarter and cooler than ever.

Heard in the SEMAsphere: SEMAx Leaders

John Waraniak, SEMA Vice President of Vehicle TechnologyThe Vehicle Technology Center (VTC) is more than an exhibit at the SEMA Show; it is a lab. It’s a social networking marketplace and a step into the future.

“The VTC sessions bring together successful entrepreneurs and a wide spectrum of movers and shakers from both inside and outside the automotive specialty-equipment industry to offer valuable insights and ideas for members to create their own preferred futures,” said John Waraniak, SEMA vice president of vehicle technology. “Tim Cook, CEO of Apple, calls these people ‘wicked smart.’ I call these folks ‘SEMAx leaders.’ They are the multipliers and catalysts, the connectors and amplifiers. They challenge the status quo. They come together to collaborate, to share fresh ideas and to find inspiration. They are optimistic about our future. They believe SEMA’s best days lie ahead.”

Silicon Valley Versus Motor City: Race for the Future of the Car

John Waraniak, SEMA Vice President of Vehicle TechnologySEMA’s Vice President of Vehicle Technology on the State of Advanced Vehicle Technology and What’s to Come

The race to define future vehicles is on. Competition for the future of the auto industry is rapidly evolving between Silicon Valley and Detroit. While product is king, vehicle electronics and software rule. The recession accelerated the auto industry’s transformational changes, which are required for growth as well as the reinvention of vehicles—from mechanical to electrical systems, from stand-alone to connected, and from mass markets to personalization and customization. The changes we are going through today will impact the performance aftermarket industry for decades to come.

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