The Allure of China

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The allure of China is undeniable. Its rising incomes, growing middle class and fast-growing vehicle market all frequently make the news in the United States. Not all the news out of China is positive, however. Almost weekly, there are stories about counterfeit goods with ties to China. Counterfeit goods cost companies in the United States billions of dollars a year.  There is no denying that intellectual property rights (IPR) protection is a problem for companies doing business in China, be it sourcing products there or selling in the market. But that doesn’t mean you should stay away from doing business in China. SEMA-member companies that have done business in China have some advice for fellow SEMA members eyeing the China market with anticipation but also trepidation: Your products will almost certainly be copied, so take steps to protect yourself.

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Sales of Luxury Auto Brands Rise in China—Capitalize on Opportunity With Your Products

BMW expects its sales in China in 2010 to grow by 30% to 120,000 units.
Mercedes-Benz aims to sell more than 100,000 passenger vehicles in
China in 2010, the vice president of sales and marketing for
Mercedes-Benz Cars said in April. Audi, the top-selling luxury brand in
China, is on course to sell more than 200,000 units there in 2010.

SEMA Members to Discover Growth and Condition of Potential Markets

Light-vehicle sales in China rose 53% in the first five months of the
year to nearly 7.2 million units, according to J.D. Power and
Associates. It’s hard to ignore that kind of momentum. Some SEMA
members aren’t. They are headed to Beijing in late September for the
SEMA-CIAPE Business Development Conference. Many see it as a good
opportunity to learn more about the China market.

Wade Kawasaki, Merritt Blakeslee Share Insight on Developing a Robust IPR Strategy in China

Wade Kawasaki, president of Exports International, longtime SEMA member
and former member of the SEMA Board of Directors, will explore the
correlation between selling in the Chinese market and intellectual
property violations. Kawasaki will join IPR guru Merritt R. Blakeslee
of the Blakeslee Law Firm on July 8, to help SEMA members learn about
best practices in protecting their intellectual property assets.


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