Aftermarket News


GMC Sierra, Chevrolet Silverado Facelifts

Fullsize prototypes for the Silverado and Sierra were caught running on the streets of Milford, Michigan, sporting new facelifts and additional visual changes.

’16 Mustang Shelby GT350R

This red Mustang Shelby GT350R prototype was seen testing on the streets of Dearborn, Michigan.

Ford GT Prototype

The Ford GT has hit public roads with an early, undisguised prototype revealing its carbon-fiber weave and a sleek, show-car shape.

Score One for the Little Guy

Score One for the Little GuyAs of June 2015, telecommunications and cable companies were knocked back on their heels when new government regulations took effect prohibiting those companies from allowing some company websites to download faster than others. The move restores what has commonly become known as net neutrality—or equal access to the Internet.

Are You Really “Too Busy” to Improve Your Business?

Jon WylyBelieve it or not, one of the most common excuses for business people to put off change is to simply declare, “We’re too busy.” Too busy to hire more help, too busy to evaluate internal systems, too busy to change a simple process that will pay for itself many times over.

If you are part of the “too busy” crowd, it’s time to stop and take a breath. Spend some time looking around the company, listen to feedback from the folks who are actually doing the work, then take some sort of positive step forward to implement bits of efficiency, no matter how small.

Motorama Milk Truck

Not content with launching just a publishing empire, Robert E. Petersen put on a series of car shows in the early ’50s that he called Motorama. The first one was held in 1950 at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, but later shows were staged at the art deco palace that was the Pan Pacific Auditorium. Hot rods, Bonneville race cars, drag racers and custom cars straight from the pages of Petersen’s magazines made up a big portion of these Motorama shows, but they also included new cars, antiques, motorcycles and classics from the ’30s and ’40s.

A Few Words With Doug Evans

On Friday, July 24, SEMA will host its annual Installation Gala. At that event, SEMA Board Chairman Nate Shelton will pass the leadership torch to SEMA’s new chairman, Doug Evans. Evans has more than 30 years experience in the industry and a long history of service on behalf of the association, including three prior terms on the Board of Directors.

SEMA News recently interviewed Evans about his perspectives, goals and priorities as chairman.

Resources to Help Your Business Save and Grow

SEMA Member NewsMembers have heard a lot lately from SEMA’s membership department about some exciting new benefits. In addition to expanding services such as data management through the SEMA Data Co-op and product-development tools through the SEMA Garage, the association still collaborates with strategic partners to offer programs aimed at saving members on their business expenses. Here is a closer look at what First Data, the Specialty Equipment Insurance Alliance and UPS offer to members.

Retail Spotlight

Velocity Automotive GroupCatering to a small niche market in Europe for the past 10 years, Velocity Automotive Group, based in Munich, imports and distributes parts from more than 500 manufacturers for American performance cars and trucks. This particular niche revolves around the Mustang, which is wildly popular in America but not nearly as common in Europe. However, according to Johannes Crepon, the company’s owner, the American performance market in Europe is still exciting because it’s so diverse. The customer base ranges from aging enthusiasts who have always dreamed of owning and restoring a vintage Mustang to Millennials who prefer late-model Camaros, Corvettes and Ram trucks.

Going Mainstream

3D Printing Going MainstreamIs there a 3D printer in your future? It’s really no longer a question of if, but when. That’s because now, after more than three decades, the technology known officially as “additive manufacturing” is finally maturing and mainstreaming—and transforming modern manufacturing in the process.

Product Development Made Easier

Mining OEM CAD Files Through SEMA’s Tech Transfer Program

Among SEMA’s many member services is its Tech Transfer program, designed to help product developers and manufacturers design and create quality components and items for vehicles from original-equipment manufacturer (OEM) data files. The program traces its roots back to 1999, when Ford first provided vehicle blueprints to SEMA to share with association members. Now housed in the new SEMA Garage—Industry Innovations Center, the Tech Transfer program has grown to encompass a wide-ranging digital catalog of CAD files from Ford, GM, Scion and Chrysler (including Fiat, Jeep and RAM). While simple in concept, accessing the program may at first appear a little daunting for first-timers. To help explain its ins and outs, SEMA News sat down for a Q&A with Gary Pis, SEMA vehicle data product manager, who coordinates the program.


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