SEMA News

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Cover Section

  • SEMA's Business Technology Committee Chairman, Bob Moore, spends a few minutes with SEMA News in a Q&A about technology, data and why SEMA companies must embrace both.
  • In a panel-style discussion, SEMA's Council leaders talk about what's on their radar for the coming year.
  • The Wally Parks NHRA Museum in Pomona, California, celebrates the cars, and guitars, of icons including Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton, Michael Anthony and Eddie Van Halen in a new exhibit. SEMA News covers the exciting premiere.

SEMA News Articles for Purchase

A Few Words With Bob Moore

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SEMA News, December 2010: Business - A Few Words With Bob Moore

While technology has been an undeniable force in the evolution of the automobile, it has also determined how cars and car parts are sold. From the first handbills to newspaper and magazine advertising to broadcast media and now the Internet, technology inevitably changes the way manufacturers, distributors and retailers sell their wares. As electronic cataloging has evolved over the past decade, the ability of parts suppliers, sellers and end users to source and find parts has gone from tedious to instantaneous—so long as sufficient and correct product information is available. Simply put, ample and easily understood information helps sell products.

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Good Product Information = Sales!

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SEMA News, December 2010: Business - Good Product Information = Sales!

This series of SEMA News stories is based on the idea of using reliable and repeatable methods to ensure business success. In coming issues, we will delve into a range of topics aimed at developing Best Practices through knowledge, motivation and skills.

Electronic cataloging and inventory controls have revolutionized the way business partners communicate with one another and how they provide information to consumers.

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Industry Trends for 2011

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SEMA News, December 2010: Business - Industry Trends for 2011

No one can predict the future, of course, but experience is a type of barometer. As we move into a new year, we called on the wisdom of some of SEMA’s most seasoned managers—who also happen to be in leadership positions with the association’s councils—to provide their opinions about what’s just down the road. We hope that their thoughts spark a few of your own.

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Product Information That Sells Parts

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SEMA News, December 2010: Chris Kersting - Product Information That Sells Parts

The SEMA Show serves as a powerful springboard that catapults the industry into the coming year. Exhibitors and attendees alike should have a full head of steam as they carry the enthusiasm generated on the Show floor back to their businesses. All of the new products and innovations discovered there can serve as an opportunity to turn positive energy and information into increased sales. In that spirit, we’ve focused this issue of SEMA News on evolving industry innovations and how they can help guide you toward improved profits.

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Selling to the World’s Most Populous Country

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SEMA News, December 2010: Business - Selling to the World’s Most Populous Country

Distributors and retailers from throughout China gathered in Beijing to meet with 21 SEMA-member companies that were participating in the first SEMA China Business Development Conference. The hotel-based program held in Beijing in September was built around a series of one-on-one meetings with pre-selected Chinese buyers who traveled to the event from cities throughout China, including Beijing, Shanghai, Ha’erbin in the far north, Guangzhou in the south and Hubei in the center of the country.

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Business

  • SEMA's Business Technology Committee Chairman, Bob Moore, spends a few minutes with SEMA News in a Q&A about technology, data and why SEMA companies must embrace both.
  • In a panel-style discussion, SEMA's Council leaders talk about what's on their radar for the coming year.
  • The Wally Parks NHRA Museum in Pomona, California, celebrates the cars, and guitars, of icons including Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton, Michael Anthony and Eddie Van Halen in a new exhibit. SEMA News covers the exciting premiere.
  • Electronic cataloging and inventory controls have revolutionized the way business partners communicate with one another and how they provide information to consumers.

Chris Kersting

  • The SEMA Show serves as a powerful springboard that catapults the industry into the coming year. Exhibitors and attendees alike should have a full head of steam as they carry the enthusiasm generated on the Show floor back to their businesses.

Government Affairs

  • The laws and regulations that govern how SEMA members do business have an increased and growing impact on the way automotive specialty-equipment products are made, distributed and marketed. As the nation and our industry struggle with a still-balky economy, SEMA’s charge is to stay on top of every relevant state and federal matter of consequence to its membership to ensure the best possible outcome. 

Industry News

International

  • Distributors and retailers from throughout China gathered in Beijing to meet with 21 SEMA-member companies that were participating in the first SEMA China Business Development Conference.

Internet

  • While groups of any kind naturally lend themselves to job opportunities, social networks can give your next career move a real bounce if used expertly. Not surprisingly, the best places to start are on the networks with millions of users.

Required Reading

SEMA Heritage

  • It was no accident that the NHRA brought the U.S. Nationals to Detroit in 1959. The Big Three were engaged in a growing horsepower war, and hot rodders were enjoying the spoils of that war, turning Detroit’s big-inch, multi-carbed mills into quarter-mile terrors.